Senin, 20 Februari 2012

Car Model - News - Business News

<p>Mechanical internalsThe same car model can be offered with different mechanical internals, such as a choice of several engine sizes, automatic or manual transmissions, different suspension, braking or steering systems, etc.; all of these options considered fairly interchangeable on that specific body frame. It is common for any specific car model to carry additional badges or letterings to announce the mechanical option(s) incorporated on it.However, when the same engineering body frame is sold under a different marque or by a partner automaker, it usually becomes, from a commercial point of view, a different car model. See badge engineering. MarketingSometimes the marketing department may give each body style variant its own trade name, creating as many car models as body variants, even though they may share a large parts commonality and the engineering department may continue to consider them all part of the same project. An example of this is the Volkswagen Golf hatchba
ck and the Volkswagen Jetta, which is of "three-box" design with a boot/trunk added to what is essentially a Golf. Conversely, the marketing department may advertise a car model as a convenient derivative of some popular car, when in fact they may be completely different engineering projects with almost no parts commonality, or from differing generations of the model. (For example, convertibles are often so heavily engineered, for a relatively small number of sales, that an older generation model is facelifted and carried forward with a new generation of the model's other body styles.) Regional variationsThe same car model may be sold by the automaker in different countries under different names. An example of this is the Mitsubishi Pajero / Montero. Trim levelsA model may be offered in varying "trim levels", which usually affect little more than upholstery (cloth or leather, for example) and standard equipment. It is common for any specific car model to carry additional bad
ges or letterings to announce its trim level. For example, the Toyota Camry's trim levels: Camry CE (Classic Edition), Camry LE (Luxury Edition), and Camry XLE (Extra Luxury Edition). Some manufacturers prefer names rather than initials for trim levels; the Renault Scnic range includes entry-level trim badged Renault Scnic Authentique, the next model up badged Renault Scnic Expression, then Renault Scnic Dynamique and finally the luxury Renault Scnic Privilge. The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution's trim levels from Evolution I to Evolution X include: RS for Rally Sport; GSR for Grand Sport Rally; SE for Special Edition; MR for Mitsubishi Racing and GT-A for Grand Touring- Automatic (note: GT-A for Evolution VII only; SE for Evolution IX only and; MR for Evolution VIII-present).The highest trim level is sometimes seen as slightly removed from the rest of the range. Ford traditionally have a Ghia luxury model above those which simply use initials, whilst Rover used the name of a fo
rmer coachbuilder, Vanden Plas. There may also be a high-performance version such as a GT.See also: trim package Market nichesOffering an array of body styles, mechanical specifications and trim levels allow manufacturers to target the same car model to different market niches. For example, the cheap, basic-trim-level, three-door variant of some popular car may be right for the student on a budget, while the station wagon with comfort package may suit the needs of an elder lady, and the very expensive, high-performance, semi-racing variant may catch the eye of the sportier-minded executive with a fat wallet, all of the three variants having arisen from the same project and carrying the same commercial name. An example of this is the Ford Focus.In a trim, terms like LX, EX, etc are also referred to as Grade. Model yearsA car model may be further subdivided into model years, all cars from a particular model year sharing approximately the same characteristics (given the same tr
im level, body style, engine option, etc.) but sometimes with slight differences from others of a different model year. In this context, a face lift may be used to slightly update the looks of an aging car model without a major engineering revision, giving way to a so-called "second series" of that particular model, and sometimes becoming the opportunity for a marketing re-launch of the same car.Many times a manufacturer decides to completely redesign the car, but with the aim of offering the new model to the same specific public or in the same market niche, keeping it similarly priced and marketed against its usual competitors from other manufacturers. The car is usually considered a different model by the engineering department, carrying a different model designator, but, for marketing reasons, it is offered to the consumers with the same old, traditional, familiar name. An example of this is the Chevrolet Corvette.Total production run for a given car is usually calculated
regarding the engineering project name or designator. The marketing department may advertise figures for a continuous-production tradename instead, divided in so-called "generations". However, for government or sport regulatory purposes, each body-style/mechanical-configuration combination may be counted as a different model. See alsoAutomakerFacelift (automobile)MarqueAutomotive packageRestylingModel yearList of automobile model and marque odditiesBadge engineeringThis automobile-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.vde Categories: Automotive industry | Automobile stubsHidden categories: Articles lacking sources from January 2009 | All articles lacking sources | Articles that may contain original research from September 2009 | All articles that may contain original research | Articles that need to be wikified from March 2009 | All articles that need to be wikified


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